Scientists Find Non-Gluten Cause of Wheat Sensitivity

Researchers presenting at the 2016 United European Gastroenterology conference have identified a group of non-gluten proteins that can trigger symptoms of asthma, multiple sclerosis, chronic pain, and more.

Gluten-free diets began as a necessity for people with celiac disease, in which violent immune reactions to wheat can cause intestinal damage, widespread inflammation, and trouble absorbing nutrients. Then the food and diet industries caught on, and suddenly a gluten-free diet was being touted as the way to lose weight, flush “toxins,” and improve everything from mental clarity to libido. An Us-Against-Them narrative emerged in the media, pitting people with an autoimmune condition against all the fools pointlessly avoiding wheat.

This bizarre, invented binary initially overlooked a third group of gluten-free eaters: people without celiac disease who still felt that wheat made them sick. Then that group began to grow and became harder to ignore—but rather than being taken seriously about their health, these folks were classed as a subtype of fool. “You’re either allergic to gluten or you’re just being a diva,” the argument went.

Read Full Article By Kate Horowitz

High carbohydrate intake from starchy foods is positively associated with metabolic disorders: a Cohort Study from a Chinese population

Abstract

Starchy foods are the main sources of carbohydrates; however, there is limited information on their metabolic impact. Therefore, we assessed the association between carbohydrates from starchy foods (Carb-S) intakes and the metabolic disorders of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and hyperlipidemia. In this study, 4,154 participants from Northern China were followed up for 4.2 years. Carb-S included rice, refined wheat, tubers, and their products. Multivariable regression models were used to calculate risk ratios (RRs) for MetS and hyperlipidemia from Carb-S, total carbohydrates, and carbohydrates from other food sources (Carb-O). Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to determine a Carb-S cut-off value. High total carbohydrate intake was associated with increased risks of MetS (RR: 2.24, 95% CI: 1.00–5.03) and hyperlipidemia (RR: 3.05, 95% CI: 1.25–7.45), compared with the first quartile. High Carb-S intake (fourth quartile) was significantly associated with MetS (RR: 1.48, 95% CI: 1.01–2.69) and hyperlipidemia (RR: 1.73, 95% CI: 1.05–3.35). No associations with Carb-O were observed. Visceral adiposity, triglyceride levels, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol significantly contributed to the metabolic disorders. The Carb-S cut-off value was 220 g. Both high total carbohydrate and Carb-S intakes were associated with hyperlipidemia and MetS; Carb-S appears to contribute more to these disorders.

Read Full Article at NCBI

Perth woman who ate kebabs for breakfast loses 55kg on a Paleo diet

A MORBIDLY obese woman who loved fast food so much she’d eat kebabs for breakfast has swapped her fast food habit for a caveman diet, and shed an amazing 55kg.

Elora Harre, 23, from Perth, was a size 24 at her biggest thanks to a solid diet of convenience foods including pizza, burgers and kebabs every day for brekkie.

But after developing headaches and sore eyes, she discovered she was pre-diabetic as a result of her eating habits, and was forced to ditch them once and for all.

Now Elora has shrunk from a size 24 to a size 12 after swapping her greasy take away food for the paleo diet, and eating meals consisting purely of natural foods.

She’s been so successful in her transformation, that she has amassed a huge online following and has just launched her own book chronicling her journey, called The Shrinking Violet — How to Lose Weight and Get Fit the paleo Way.

Read Full Article By Lauren Croft (News.com.au)

ZINN TO PARENTS: DON’T FEED CEREALS TO YOUR BABIES!

Parents should not feed cereals to their infants as first foods, says New Zealand-based dietitian and academic, Dr Caryn Zinn. Zinn (pictured right) said this in her evidence in chief at the trial of University of Cape Town emeritus professor Tim Noakes,

It went to the heart of the matter of the Health Professions Council of SA (HPCSA) case against Noakes in Cape Town on October 26. Here, in Part 2 of a two-part series on her testimony, Zinn looks at what science has to say about foods that parents should give infants: 

The HPCSA has charged Noakes with unprofessional conduct. That is for a single tweet telling a breastfeeding mother that good foods for infant weaning are LCHF. In other words, Noakes suggested meat, dairy and vegetables. The HPCSA alleges that that advice is unconventional. Thus, it claims that Noakes was unprofessional for advising it.

Read Full Article By Marika Sboros

How the USDA Screwed Up the American Diet — and Deprived Me of So Much Delicious Butter

Back in the late 1800s, Emperor Napoleon III of France offered a prize to anyone who could come up with a substitute for butter that would be cheap enough to be used by the lower classes. The winning spread, invented by a chemist named Hippolyte Mège-Mouriès and composed of rendered beef fat and skim milk, became known as margarine.

Mège-Mouriès may have won the prize, but he couldn’t fool the French into eating the stuff — not even the poor French — so he sold the patent to a Dutch company. Later that century, in the face of a beef-tallow shortage (I know; hard to believe), another chemist, from Binghamton, New York, came up with a way to manufacture margarine from a combination of animal and vegetable fats. The Great Depression further reduced the availability of animal fat, while butter shortages during World War II increased the popularity of an all-vegetable-oil version.

Read Article By Sandy Hingston

Dr. Ted Naiman on Blood Tests, Diabetes, Obesity, Carbohydrate and more

Caught up with Dr. Ted Naiman (yes, THE Ted Naiman) in Seattle today, and had a chat on some of the key elements that enable long-term health and longevity. Wondering about the most important blood tests? Ok we talked about those. The ideal diet for the human species? Yep – had a few words. The best diagnostic tests for cardiovascular disease? Yup. What about the most optimum (and yet easiest to do) exercise for your health? Hey, we covered that too – and then some !