Senate Committee releases report into AHPRA bullying of Dr. Gary Fettke

The (Australian) Senate Community Affairs References Committee conducted an inquiry into the Medical complaints process in Australia focusing on bullying in the health professions. The committees report was published on 10 May 2017.

A section has been devoted to the treatment that Dr. Gary Fettke received from AHPRA, while under Parliamentary Privilege as a witness to the Inquiry into the Australian Heath Practitioners Regulatory Agency (AHPRA) last year.

Read the Full Report


When the Dietitians Association of Australia (DAA) isn’t dishing up fake nutrition news to the public, it makes up fake news to try to discredit dietitians who cross it, say critics. It’s probably no coincidence, that those dietitians support low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) diets to treat obesity, diabetes and heart disease and/or criticise Australia’s dietary guidelines and DAA’s food industry links.

Critics say that  DAA’s Big Food sponsors don’t like those dietitians either as they affect product sales. In the final of a four-part series on DAA’s conflicts of interest, looks at the cases of three dietitians who fell foul of DAA and its long-time CEO Claire Hewat. DAA also thought nothing of going after one of the dietitians in another country. It tried and failed to silence a top dietitian academic in New Zealand for her views on LCHF.

Hewat flatly denies that LCHF or its industry links had anything to do with actions against the dietitians below. Here, looks at whether that claim stands up to scrutiny.

Read Full Article By Marika Sboros (FoodMed.Net)

John Arnold Made a Fortune at Enron. Now He’s Declared War on Bad Science

BRIAN NOSEK HAD pretty much given up on finding a funder. For two years he had sent out grant proposals for his software project. And for two years they had been rejected again and again—which was, by 2011, discouraging but not all that surprising to the 38-year-old scientist. An associate professor at the University of Virginia, Nosek had made a name for himself in a hot subfield of social psychology, studying people’s unconscious biases. But that’s not what this project was about. At least, not exactly.

Like a number of up-and-coming researchers in his generation, Nosek was troubled by mounting evidence that science itself—through its systems of publication, funding, and advancement—had become biased toward generating a certain kind of finding: novel, attention grabbing, but ultimately unreliable. The incentives to produce positive results were so great, Nosek and others worried, that some scientists were simply locking their inconvenient data away.

Read Full Article By SAM APPLE (Wired)