kwashiorkor

How much protein is excessive?

As we discussed last week, excessive protein is turned into glucose and then to fat. But how much protein is excessive? That’s the real question that stirs up all kinds of controversy. The Recommended Daily Allowance for an adult is 0.8 g/kg per day. How did we get that number? Let’s start at the beginning.

First, I am only dealing with the steady state here. If you are trying to build muscle (body building) then you would need more protein. If you are pregnant or breast feeding or a child still growing, then protein requirements are higher because you are trying to add protein to your body. This discussion only deals with adults at a relatively stable state.

Proteins are made up of building blocks called amino acids, of which there are about 20 common ones. While we talk about protein requirements, really the body needs amino acids. This makes up about 16% of the weight of protein, so that if you eat 56 grams of steak, you do not get 56 grams of protein, but really require about 6 times more by weight (approximately).

Read Article By Dr. Jason Fung

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ALZHEIMER’S: CAN RIGHT DIET PREVENT IT? SURE, HERE’S HOW!

Do you have insulin resistance? If you don’t know, you’re not alone. This is perhaps the single most important question any of us can ask about our physical and mental health. Yet most patients, and even many doctors, don’t know how to answer it.

Here in the US, insulin resistance has reached epidemic proportions: more than half of us are now insulin resistant. Insulin resistance is a hormonal condition that sets the stage throughout the body for inflammation and overgrowth, disrupts normal cholesterol and fat metabolism, and gradually destroys our ability to process carbohydrates.

Insulin resistance puts us at high risk for many undesirable diseases, including obesity, heart disease, cancer, and type 2 diabetes.

Read Article By Georgia Ede

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Don’t scapegoat Big Sugar. Lots of food producers profited from the demonisation of fat.

The recent revelation that Harvard scientists were paid off to downplay sugar’s harms in the 1960s shows how the food industry shockingly manipulated nutrition science for decades. Yet the news media has given the sugar industry too much credit. The real story about how sugar got a pass — while dietary fat and cholesterol were blamed for heart disease — reveals that other industries played a role, as did, surprisingly, many of the country’s leading scientists.

Read Article By Nina Teicholz (LA Times)

An illustration related to the more contemporary food/nutrition portions as outlined by the USDA in 2011. This "My Plate" style of display replaces the previous "food pyramid" used for many years.

Dietary Guidelines article won’t be retracted

Politico reports that the BMJ will not retract “controversial” dietary guidelines article by Nina Teicholz, author of New York Times best-seller, The Big Fat Surprise

Via Politico’s Morning Agriculture (MA) blog, Teicholz said she was notified of the journal’s decision after it conducted a months-long review:

A controversial article questioning the science behind the U.S. Dietary Guidelines that appeared in the British Medical Journal a year ago today won’t be retracted, its author, Nina Teicholz, tells MA. “The BMJ has informed me, in writing, that they have made the decision not to retract the article,” Teicholz said in an email.

Read Article By DEAN STERLING JONES

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New study questions Type 2 diabetes treatment

It’s a curious case of missing evidence. When a diabetes specialist searched the medical literature looking for proof to support the use of glucose-lowering drugs for Type 2 diabetes, he couldn’t find it.

That absence of evidence raises questions about one of the most firmly entrenched beliefs in modern medicine — that tightly controlling elevated blood sugar will reduce the risk of death, stroke, kidney failure, blindness and other dire outcomes associated with Type 2 diabetes.

“Does controlling your sugars reduce the risk of complications?” Dr. Victor Montori, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., asked in a paper released this month in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. “Most experts say yes. The evidence appears to say ‘not so fast.'”

Read Article By Kelly Crowe (CBS)

thomas-seyfried

CANCER: SEYFRIED ON REAL CAUSE, RIGHT DIET TO BEAT IT

Come with me on a remarkable journey with US psychiatrist and psychopharmacologistDr Georgia Ede as she delves into the mind of Dr Thomas Seyfried. Seyfried is a biology professor and brain cancer researcher at Illinois University, with over 25 years’ experience in the field.

In 2012, Ede attended a presentation Seyfried gave on cancer at the Ancestral Health Symposium at Harvard Law School. It challenged everything she thought she knew about the dread disease. It inspired her to read Seyfried’s brilliant book, Cancer as a Metabolic Disease: On the Origin, Management, and Prevention of Cancer. 

The secrets inside are so important, Ede has made them available to everyone in a fascinating four-part series on her blog, Diagnosis Diet – Nutrition Science Meets Common Sense. It covers what Seyfried says about the real causes of cancer, and the role of ketogenic diets. Here’s Ede’s first blog, with links to the rest. – Marika Sboros

Read Article By Georgia Ede

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Dr. Ted Naiman on Blood Tests, Diabetes, Obesity, Carbohydrate and more

Caught up with Dr. Ted Naiman (yes, THE Ted Naiman) in Seattle today, and had a chat on some of the key elements that enable long-term health and longevity. Wondering about the most important blood tests? Ok we talked about those. The ideal diet for the human species? Yep – had a few words. The best diagnostic tests for cardiovascular disease? Yup. What about the most optimum (and yet easiest to do) exercise for your health? Hey, we covered that too – and then some !